The justice system sets the context within which legal problems are recognised, disputed and resolved, particularly those within criminal and family law. Although legal need surveys have identified that most civil law problems will not involve the courts and tribunals, how options for dispute resolution are perceived and experienced is crucial to understanding how the system can support access to justice for all. Since its inception, the Foundation has conducted projects with the courts and tribunals, predominantly within NSW.

Coroner’s court

Coroners courts in many jurisdictions throughout Australia are seeking ways to ensure their processes and practices are culturally sensitive, particularly for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands families. This report analyses key literature to guide discussion and further services development. See here.

Civil courts and tribunals.

Between 2015 and 2018, at the request of the NSW Department of Justice, the Foundation reviewed NSW Court and Tribunal data to assess its utility for understanding who is using the justice system, for what purpose and for what outcomes.

Other Foundation research reports on courts and tribunals are listed here:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Families in Australian Coroners Courts: A review of the research literature on improving court experiences

Coroners courts in many jurisdictions throughout Australia are seeking ways to ensure their processes and practices are culturally sensitive, particularly for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands families. This report…

Case management: rolling list in the Family Court, Sydney Registry. A report on the DCM program in the Common Law Division of the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

This report provides preliminary information about practitioners’ perceptions of rolling list, not an analysis of the impact of the procedure on the practitioners, their clients or the Court.